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2 edition of Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire found in the catalog.

Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire

Warren P. Clary

Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire

by Warren P. Clary

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  • 4 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station in [Ogden, Utah] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rangelands -- Utah -- Revegetation.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementWarren P. Clary.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research note INT -- 384.
    ContributionsIntermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6, [1] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17674111M

    Seeding rate. Triticale does not tiller well. The desired plant density for triticale is plants/m² up to plants/m² in high rainfall zones. Depending on seed size this equates to a seeding rate of kg/ha. If sowing is delayed, or when sowing on light sandy soils, the higher plant density should be the target. Seed dressings. Factors affecting seed dormancy include the presence of certain plant hormones--notably, abscisic acid, which inhibits germination, and gibberellin, which ends seed dormancy. To break chemical dormancy, you might have to leach the seed .

    Soil stabilization Water erosion. Post fire seeding evolved from a desire to stabilize hillslope soils in hilly terrain after a wildfire and prevent downstream flooding and debris/mud flows. The assumption being supplemental seeding immediately after a wildfire would provide vegetation cover lost in the wildfire. A seed rate of about 25 kg/ha is required, but this depends on the seed size. 10 kg is enough to plant 1 acre and 5 kg for half an acre. Small seed will go further, and give equal germination and yield performance as large seed. However, small seed should not be planted too deep (i.e., not deeper than 5 cm).File Size: KB.

      A second challenge is that different measures (e.g., cover, density) of plant abundance are reported among studies, and these measures may emphasize different aspects of the community. In this study, cover was chosen as the primary measure for analysis, as cover was reported in 68% of community studies of secondary succession and is a long-used Cited by: Seeding rangeland following wildfire is a central tool managers use to stabilize soils and inhibit the spread of invasive plants. Rates of successful seeding on arid rangeland, however, are low. The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which water availability, invasive plant abundance, and seeding technology influence postfire seedling establishment.


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Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire by Warren P. Clary Download PDF EPUB FB2

Comparisons of several seeding techniques were made following two wildfires in central Utah. In instances where two seeding techniques could be directly compared on the same site, the most intensive seeding technique always resulted in greater density and cover of seeded grasses.

Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire Author: Warren P Clary ; Intermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah) ; United States. Plant density and cover response to several seeding techniques following wildfire / Warren P.

: Warren P. Clary. increase total plant cover in any ofthe three post-fire years. Aseed mix containing mostly native species increased seeded species cover, but failed to increase in total plant cover, as reductions in non-seeded species cover largely offset increases in seeded species cover.

The seed mix also reduced the cover and. Seeding and fertilization, applied alone and together, did little to increase total plant cover in any of the three post-fire years. A seed mix containing mostly native species increased seeded species cover, but failed to increase in total plant cover, as reductions in non-seeded species cover largely offset increases in seeded species by: Vegetation Response to post-wildfire seeding: Bull Canyon wildfire 1 intRoduCtion About wildfires occur in British Columbia every year, affecting an average of ha annually.

Many of these wildfires occur on lands tenured for livestock grazing in the BC Interior and can therefore have important effects on the forage resource. Seeding with proper grasses; proper seedbed preparationand location and proper care and maintenance can help reduce surface erosion, sediment and runoff in first and/or first 2 seasons following wildfire depending on site conditions, seed choice, water holding ability of soil, timing, supplemental irrigation, seeding cover, etc.

Annual grass invasions often increase the frequency and extent of wildfire. Climate variability and fire history may have modifying effects on invasion success and its link to changing fire regimes.

Characterize the role of climate variability and fire history in vegetation shifts of an invaded desert landscape. Pre- and post-fire landscape vegetation greenness were assessed on multiple Cited by: Which of the following is the main advantage of using a one firefighter spread with a rolled salvage cover.

() A. One person can remove water from basements. One person can IN in the use of the salvage cover. One person can reroll the salvage cover during overhaul. One person can quickly unroll the salvage cover across the top of. Back inI was an industrial engineer at Toyota in India, helping prepare assembly lines and dispatch systems for car manufacture.

One day, a scientist named Akira Miyawaki came to the factory to plant a forest on Toyota’s campus. He gave a presentation on his methods, and I became so fascinated that I decided I wanted to learn how to plant a forest.

Vegetation responses following wildfire on grazed and ungrazed sagebrush semi-desert. A year set of cover data on sagebrush semi-desert plant communities responding to wildfire and livestock grazing near Mills in central Utah provided an opportunity to compare the assumptions and adaptability of classical and state-and-transition models for.

Abstract. Despite fire cycles of increasing severity and frequency in the arid western U.S., very little empirical analysis has examined the success of plant seeding on arid rangeland following fire. This manuscript uses a unique dataset to assess causal factors underlying the measured densities, several years after fires, Cited by: Examining post-wildfire reseeding on and rangeland: A multivariate tobit modelling approach success of plant seeding on arid rangeland following fire.

cover and density. Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species.

However, seeding treatments can also have negative effects such as competition with recovering native plant communities and. Single-year seeding events in the year immediately following wildfire, however, remain the primary management treatment in response to annual grass invasion and dominance (Eiswerth and Shonkwiler.

Total plant cover was approximately 55% under both treatments. Seeded species cover was higher in seeded (8%) than in unseeded plots (%). Inseeding (a mixture of perennial graminoids and forbs) and control treatments were randomly assigned to plots (6×8 m) established at each of four sites in an area that was burnt by.

Fire Management and Invasive Plants A Handbook. Acknowledgements: % density, cover, and/or biomass) of species previously present but relatively uncommon within an area. Invasiveness. The tendency of a species to Plant invasions can occur for several reasons.

The),))) plants +--)File Size: 1MB. term. We sampled understory plant species richness, diversity, and cano-py cover one to six years post fire ( toand ) on 72 per-manent plots selected in a stratified random sample to define post-fire vegetation response to burn severity, post-fire seeding with native grasses, RESUMEN A medida que el tamaño y la extensión de los.

increasing time since fire. Based on cover data from all 57 sites, total plant cover in seeded sites and controls was nearly identical by years 4 and 5 post-wildfire. A seeding treatment‟s ability to reduce soil erosion and/or affect native plant community recovery appears to be strongly driven by amount and timing of precipitation.

: D. Peppin, P. Fule, J. Beyers, C. Sieg, M. Hunter. Fertilization and Seeding Effects on Vegetative Cover After Wildfire in North-Central Washington State David W. Peterson, Erich K. Dodson, and Richy J.

Harrod Abstract: Land surface treatments are often applied after severe wildfires to mitigate runoff and erosion threats. Seeding is one of the most common post-fire rehabilitation techniques (Beyers ; Robichaud et al.; Peppin et al. ), largely due to its perceived success in post-fire erosion mitigation and low cost, but resulting plant cover is highly variable, and purposely seeded and non-native species inadvertently introduced as part of the Cited by:   Fuel management techniques are commonly used in shrublands to reduce wildfire risk.

However, more information about the ecological effects of these treatments is needed by managers and ecologists. In an effort to address this need, we performed a replicated (4 replicates per treatment) ha experiment in northern California chaparral dominated by Cited by: Seed rate to be used for sowing can then be calculated using the following formula.

For example: for a target population of plants/m 2 and using seed of average weight (35 mg) and a laboratory germination test of 95 percent. Seed rate = x 35/90 or 39 kg ha-1 (check the first table for likely establishment percent).

For a plot size of 10 m x eight rows (at 20 cm spacing).